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The Mayor is ABC’s new political comedy that revolves around struggling young rapper Courtney Rose (Brandon Michael Hall, Search Party), who runs for mayor of his hometown as a publicity stunt for his new album. Completely unexpected, he gets elected and becomes the new mayor of Fort Grey, California.

Courtney gets help from his two friends (Bernard David Jones and Marcel Spears) and his mother (Yvette Nicole Brown, Community). And now that she is out of a job, the campaign manager of Rose’s opponent (Lea Michele, Glee) offers her help because he literally knows nothing about politics.

The funny thing about The Mayor that it is not only a straightforward fish-out-of-water comedy, but if you listen closely, it is also a satire of the political state of the country. The good news, though, is that the creators have managed to make The Mayor not at all cynical or polarizing, which is quite a feat for political satire. (And it needs to be pointed out that the show was first pitched before Donald Trump won the GOP nomination).

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In my preview, I was expecting a lot from The Mayor. And while I came out of the series premiere mostly satisfied, the trailer truly did contain the highlights of the episode. Especially in the beginning, the pilot episode felt a little chaotic. It jumps around from Courtney campaigning (or rather, promoting himself and his album) to him discussing the why and how of his candidacy with his mother (which is a little weird since the campaign appears to have been underway for a while at that point). But his earnesty strikes a chord with the people and, all of a sudden, he wins the election.

The good news is that all that was just necessary to set the scene, because the actual story starts at the point where Courtney gets elected. The best and most heartfelt moments come when Courtney is discussing his candidacy and later his victory with his mother, who doesn’t have all the answers but makes him think about the consequences of what he’s doing.

All in all, The Mayor is as likeable as I expected it to be, anchored by Brandon Michael Hall’s charisma and Yvette Nicole Brown who gives it a voice of reason and a healthy dose of sarcasm. The central problem of the show, for now, is Courtney needing to decide between his career as a rapper and his sudden political career. In the long run, that is not really a sustainable dilemma, but if The Mayor can figure that out, and flesh out some of the supporting characters, it can go a long way.

The Mayor airs on Tuesdays at 9:30/8:30c on ABC.

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